Winnipeg's homeless population

Winnipeg's homeless population, Vladimir Volenyuk

Volunteers are really making a difference helping those who are in need. We are talking homeless people, poor, sick, disabled, children without parents…, the list is endless, so each volunteer, each day and each hour they give and provide the service, really helps those people and the cities to stay cleaner and a better place to live in.

An organization working to end homelessness in the city called for change Wednesday while releasing a report that showed in some ways.

The report compiled results of 406 interviews conducted between July and October of 2018 at emergency shelters and community agencies that serve people who are homeless.

“Again, approximately 70 percent of the people we interviewed were of Indigenous descent. Nearly half of them had spent time in child protection services,” Isaak said the reports of mental health concerns were also very high, with 65 percent of respondents reporting they had been diagnosed with a mental illness during their lifetime.

Participants also shared information about how they access food, income and health services, how much sleep they get, and many other details of their daily lives.

To read the full report and for more information please visit a link below:

https://streetcensuswpg.ca/

Winnipeggers are not the exception, Winnipeggers volunteer every day in many areas and on all possible levels. Especially big impact if whole organization volunteers and join the movement. The Saul Sair Health Centre at Siloam Mission offers head-to-toe care to those who are experiencing homelessness in Winnipeg. They literally help people in need to stay on their feet, the foot clinic accepts up to 20 people each day. “They don’t have the means to maybe wash their feet every day or their body every day. They don’t have the luxury of changing their socks every day,” says Angelika Fletcher, health centre manager.

Most of the people that come to the health centre are homeless, not only they are on their feet most part of the day, they have to walk everywhere they go, but also at the end of the day, they do not have the luxury to come back home, take the shoes off, put the feet to warm water, relax and then just throw wet and dirty socks into a washer and simply put a pair of clean, dry and warm socks on to stay warm and protect their feet.

Salvation Army vehicle helps homeless during cold winter nights
Winnipeg homeless volunteers Saul Sair Health Centre
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