Winnipeg bus driver shield plan passed by committee

Winnipeg bus driver shield plan passed by committee, Vladimir Volenyuk

City authorities recognize and understand the importance of constant transport infrastructure growth and modernization to be able to satisfy the needs of Winnipeg citizens and a workforce visiting our city every day. Mayor Brian Bowman says the city transport system needs a major overhaul.

 “We really have to make tough decisions to really improve the transit. I'm from Charleswood. I rode 66 all my life, and the routes haven't changed much. This is your grandparents' transit service. ”

The committee decision means all 630 Winnipeg Transit buses could be outfitted with driver safety shields, something the local transit union and other organizations have been pushing for since the February 2017 murder of a driver.

The city authorities also plan to install safety shields on all Winnipeg buses. The cost to purchase shields for all Winnipeg buses is estimated at $3.15 million.

After testing a selection of shields, Transit shared a video of the model selected to be installed on all buses. The city launched a pilot project on six buses which wrapped up in August 2018, allowing drivers to test different types of shields. More than 700 drivers tested out each shield and were able to fill out a survey sharing which one they preferred.

If approved, the shields will be purchased from AROW Global, which specializes in transit window systems, and will be an adjustable pane one-piece door design.

The city’s infrastructure committee passed the decision 3-1, with only Coun. Matt Allard voting against, saying he’d prefer to see the idea go through the regular budget process for 2019.

The decision now passes to EPC and then city council for final debate and approval.

December 20th The City of Winnipeg officially opened two-point duty Winnipeg Transit inspector stations. Both stations are located downtown, one of them at eastbound Graham Avenue and Fort Street, another on eastbound Portage Avenue at Vaughan Street, near The Bay.

The locations were strategically chosen by comparing incident data, according to Randy Tonellier Winnipeg Transit‘s Manager of Operations.

Bowman said that the city council should be prepared to take political risks to shake things up for the better, and that, although he calls 2019 the “year of transit,” the council will have to go beyond the current authority.

He said that the city has so far collaborated with the Transit Advisory Committee on the implementation of the recommendations, but much remains to be done.

The stations cost about $30,000 to build and four new positions were created, Tonellier said.

The operational review will address the issue of better aligning investments in fast transit, regular transit, further electrification of the Winnipeg Transit fleet, improving security and analyzing high-frequency networks.

Matt Allard, a member of the Transit Advisory Committee, said Wednesday afternoon that he was glad to hear the mayor's message about transit.

Allard said that the most obvious solution for improving the quality of transit traffic is also the most expensive - adding more buses to the Winnipeg transit fleet.

Allard said the city will buy new buses, many of which are articulated, so they will carry more passengers, at about the same overall operating costs. It is great information for all citizens of Winnipeg and people, who come here for work.

The city authorities recognize the growth of our city`s needs, the population grows every year and the workforce visiting Winnipeg constantly increases as well. Public transportation is a very important part of city infrastructure modernization and development.

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